Archive for December, 2013

Arianne and Hamish

Posted on December 16th, 2013

I met Arianne and Hamish in the most serendipitous of ways. Arianne and I agreed at many times throughout the planning stages that it was meant to be. Our love of Ballet coupled with so many other similarities made it a really rewarding wedding to be involved in.

So, you want to know the story? Well, the chance-meeting took place almost a year ago in Carla Zampatti’s Double Bay store to be exact – Arianne shopping for work clothes with a patient Hamish and me assisting a bride-to-be find a wedding gown.

In a round about way I got to talking with Arianne and Hamish and uncovered that they were both newly engaged. One thing led to another and we parted our separate ways…I had hoped that they would be in touch.

After a year passed; A fabulous job opportunity for Hamish meant that the duo had to re-locate to Melbourne. Planning a wedding is one thing but from interstate whilst simultaneously juggling a very busy work schedule meant that Arianne and Hamish needed someone to help with the finishing touches of their wedding day.

So, it was with absolute pleasure to be able to step in on their special day and see the two celebrate with family and friends at the very private and affluent Pymble Golf Club.

Without further adieu and thanks to the very talented Nerida McMurray Photography, let the show begin…

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography001

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography002

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography005

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography012

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography013

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography018

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography010

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography021

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography028

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography017

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography033

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography061

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography056

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography036

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography042

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography073

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography077

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography081

A&H_NeridaMcMurrayPhotography087

Photography / Nerida McMurray
Venue / Pymble Golf Club
Month / October 2013
Dress / Vera Wang
Scent / Chanel Mademoiselle
Flowers / Madame FH
Band / Baker Boys
Hair / Alana Kristian Hair 9371 8334
Makeup / Molly Oakfield
Planning / White Rabbit Projects
Cake / Simmone Logue
Stationary / Robyn Harrison 9997 3334

 

 

 

 

Keeping with Tradition – Lisa and Gidon

Posted on December 2nd, 2013

This is the story of Lisa and Gidon. My version that is. The first thing to note is that Lisa and Gidon were the very first Traditional Jewish wedding planned by the team at White Rabbit Projects. To me this was such a tremendous honour and of course a leap of faith for them as client and me as the planner. Lisa and I often laughed and agreed that this was certainly a good path-way into planning Jewish weddings, and I very much look forward to many more Mazel Tov’s in the future.

Here are some beautiful traditions that I learned thanks to Lisa whilst planning this very special day. It really was just that and I feel very blessed to have witnessed this day especially.

Bedeken – Before the ceremony, the Bedeken takes place where the Groom places the veil over the Bride’s face, reciting a blessing. This ritual comes from the biblical story of Rebecca, who when she first saw Isaac across the field, took her veil and covered her face as a sign of her exclusive commitment to him. Lisa and Gidon chose to do the bedeken in the presence of only a few close friends and family to preserve the intimacy of the moment. A signal that the wedding celebration has begun.

Ketubah – The Jewish tradition of the Ketubah (marriage contract) is over two thousand years old. It can be written in ancient Aramaic, modern Hebrew or English, and it outlines the groom’s responsibility to and for the bride. Today the Ketubah is more a declaration of love and commitment.

Chuppah – The wedding ceremony takes place under the chuppah (hu-pah) which is the wedding canopy that symbolises among other things, the home the Bride and Groom are creating together. Its sides are open to and supported by friends, family, and community. One reason why there are no walls is that this openness is an expression that marriage, though exclusive and inviolable, is not a closed system. The family is part of a community, the community part of the world.

Symbolically, the simple, fragile roof reminds us “to live content with small means: to seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion, to be worthy not respectable, and wealthy not rich”. It also shows that the marriage is the establishment of a home, an island or sanity and serenity. The chuppah is a legal instrument and the Talmud considers it biblically required for marriage.

Seven Circles – Custom has the bride, as she arrives under the chuppah, circling the groom seven times. The number seven is important in the Jewish wedding ceremony as it represents the seven days of creation. It also has a Kabbalistic (Jewish mysticism) significance. The ancient custom of the bride circling the groom seven times was seen as a means of protection, the bride creating an invisible wall to protect the groom from evils. Today, the circling may also be seen as a way to bind the couple together and symbolise the creation of a new family circle.

Kiddushin – The wedding celebration is composed of two distinct and successive ceremonies: betrothal/engagement (kiddushin) and nuptials/marriage (nissuin). Wine is the symbol of joy in the Jewish tradition and is associated with the Kiddush (the sanctification prayer recited on the Sabbath and festivals). After the initial blessing over the wine, the rabbi recites the betrothal blessing.

Nissuin – The second half of the wedding ceremony and consists of the Shevah B’rachot (Seven Blessings). The blessings cover many themes – the creation of the world and of humanity, the survival of the Jewish people and of Israel, the marriage, the couple’s happiness and the raising of the family. It puts the state of marriage into a dynamic relationship with the beginning and end of history

Breaking of the Glass –  The ceremony traditionally ends with the groom stomping on a wine glass. There is a lot of symbolism about this act – It reminds us that although this is a happy time in our lives, joy cannot exist without the sadness of the destruction of the temple, times of expulsion and more recently the Holocaust. Even at the moment of life’s greatest joy, there is still great darkness in the world which we must continue to repair. It also says that just as the shattered glass can never be repaired, marriage changes a couple permanently – in their own eyes and in the eyes of the world. This is also the conclusion of the ceremony where guests shout Mazal Tov (good fortune).

1461851_549770138442267_1468152623_n

1452271_549770171775597_949227519_n

1002618_549770185108929_823743787_n

DSC_8124
DSC_8077

DSC_8099

DSC_8076

1390630_549769711775643_2113204832_n

1459834_549770351775579_1819453015_n

1461195_549770375108910_1821208371_n

1450849_549769768442304_2132137626_n

563981_549770378442243_1617354648_n

1471790_549770458442235_1291590293_n

999635_549769781775636_611123417_n

529494_549770415108906_2141966414_n

563996_549769858442295_767921851_n

1472995_549769885108959_1294317101_n

1454887_549770525108895_1642782632_n

1467424_549769948442286_1236337753_n

1422487_549769878442293_38075336_n

1396056_549769965108951_1545894722_n

1458433_549770041775610_213140150_n

_DSC9723

_DSC9721

_DSC9735

_DSC9729

DSC_8136

DSC_8135

DSC_8134

DSC_8605

DSC_8604

DSC_8137

DSC_8608

DSC_8607

DSC_8609

DSC_8669

DSC_8671

DSC_8672

DSC_8860

DSC_8902

DSC_8954

 

Venue – Sydney Polo Club, Richmond
Photography + Videography – Starr
Entertainment – Brett Martin (Reception) and Lonely Swingers (Ceremony)
Flowers – Wilder
Catering – L’Amour
Cars – HF Weddings 
Wedding Planning and Styling – ‘Us’